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Gifting Tips for Loved Ones Living with Alzheimer's

It's the most wonderful time of the year again! The holidays are near and whether you have a loved one who is living with Alzheimer's disease or not, it can be important to get the right gift for your person.

Here are some gift tips for loved one's living with Alzheimer's for this holiday season.

Gift tips for Alzheimer's: consider their stage of disease

For loved ones with dementia, one way to keep them active and engaged is by gifting them with presents specific to the stage they are in.

Music and fidget toys have been my go-to gifts over the ten years of caring for my mom. I have made adjustments to these gifts accordingly. For example, in the early stages I gifted my mom her own iPod and headphones whereas now in the final stages, I gift her new wireless over-the-ear headphones.

A loved one with dementia might enjoy the holiday events for hours on end if they have an active mind and plenty to keep them busy. Gifting mentally stimulating gifts such as music albums (recorded concerts) or instruments can be just the ticket for your loved one with dementia!

For those who love to get their fidget on, there's always a variety out now like sensory pillows or busy boards that allow for relief and a more calming quality bonding time.

Photos or favorite memories from the past

If you're looking for something to give your loved one this holiday season, consider an experience that focuses on the past. For example, you could gift a photo album created from Shutterfly and include some of your favorite family photos.

This gift will allow your loved one to reminisce about the past with you but will, more importantly - your family gets those memories as well. If you want to take your album to another level, you can also think about turning them into coloring pages!

In a world where so many people are focused on materialism, it's refreshing to know that there is another way of looking at things. When you gift your loved ones with memories from their past they will truly appreciate the gesture and value these moments in life even more than any other object.

A photo album can act as an excellent reminder for your loved one and give you both time together in sharing these precious moments from years past!

Activities that cater to your loved one's daily interests

Make personal hygiene a little easier by gifting a basket filled with nail polish, perfume, lotions, and soaps. You can even purchase combs and brushes made especially for people who have Alzheimer's disease. These products are not intimidating and pleasant smelling so they can bring tangible and sensory stimulation to your loved one.

Another gift can be a wearable one. Keep in mind that these items should make an impact on the wearer's everyday life so think easy and functional. An easy and functional wardrobe can help keep them safe and comfortable while also looking quite stylish at the same time!

Get creative with the gifts you purchase

If you're looking for gifts to give your loved one with Alzheimer's, we hope this list of possibilities has been helpful. Remember that the person may not be able to tell you what they want or need at any given time and as such, it is important to have a wide variety of items on hand so that there are always options available.

The last thing anyone wants is for their loved ones with dementia to feel lonely or forgotten during the holidays - or anytime! So please don't forget about them in all the hustle and bustle of holiday preparations.

What are your gift tips for a loved one with Alzheimer's? Tell us about your experience in the comments below, or share your story with the community.

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