Becoming a Caregiver After Childhood Abuse

To make this short, I am 69 years old and was abused sexually by my father. I tried to tell my mother, but she called me a liar and did nothing. I handled it myself by saying no, so my childhood was not very good. My father did go to jail after many years of abusing other family members. He died in 2017, my brother died in 2007, and I am the only child left.

Taking care of Mom

My mother could not live by herself. She couldn't drive she had forgotten how to cook. She was also scared at night. Because of this, we moved in together in 2017. In the last three years she could hardly talk, and half of the time she does not know who I am. She has also fallen three times.

Living and coping with Mom's Alzheimer's

I have to listen to how good of a man my dad was. She knows he went to jail, but she says he was always good to her. She will get something in her head and will not let it go or believe me. I have tried to change the subject but that don’t work. She worries all the time, has problems constipation and peeing.

She will only eat one bowl cereal all day long until dinner and then say that she can’t eat much. She then goes to her room with cookies and candy; she loves her sweets. She drinks a gallon of chocolate milk in 5 days and won’t drink much water.

Mom's paranoia and delusions

She does not sleep well, she has had me call the cops once, and I have had to take her to the bank several times because she is afraid of someone taking her money. I take her doctor appointments and she will tell me they said something else, even when I’m right there. She thinks she is dying if she does not have some kind of surgery. No one has ever said that. Beside having Alzheimer's she has macular degeneration so she is legally blind.

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